Eight vacation destinations set to move from Amber List to Green List after June 3 review

Government ministers are reportedly considering adding up to eight holiday destinations to the green list following a review of restrictions tomorrow (June 3).

Popular tourist traps including the Canary Islands, Balearic Islands, Barbados, Malta and Grenada could be listed with Finland, Jamaica and Morocco based on their current Covid-19 rates.

Green List countries allow travel without quarantine, although testing is required before departure and upon return to the UK.

There are currently only 12 countries and territories on the green level, but some of them, including Australia and New Zealand, still do not allow visitors, limiting options to those looking for desperately a summer getaway.

Portugal, which hosted the Champions League final between Manchester City and Chelsea last weekend, are currently one of the only options for Britons seeking sunshine.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps is expected to confirm changes to the Green, Amber and Red lists at a press conference Thursday at 5 p.m., where it is hoped more countries will have gone green.

Officials are believed to be hoping to announce the first update on Thursday to take effect on Monday, June 7.

According to Standard Evening, a new analysis suggests that many European island holiday destinations should be included in the green list.

Paul Charles, managing director of travel consultancy PC Agency, said the Canaries and the Balearic Islands, including Mallorca, Ibiza and Tenerife, should be on the green list.

The agency provides an analysis of each country’s progress in its vaccination rate, 7-day infections and 14-day infections.

Before the first Green List announcement, Charles was specific in his prediction that Gibraltar and Portugal would turn the tide and be added to the Green List.

The analysis also indicates that Finland, Jamaica, the Balearics, Barbados, Malta, Morocco and Grenada are also expected to be moved to the green list next week.

Robert Boyle, a former BA strategist added that if it is too early to add the United States to the green list, Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Italy and Luxembourg could be classified as green. .

He said: “Putting the United States on the green list would be huge news, but with the government coming under fire for not putting India on the red list soon enough, I suspect they will want to be. seen as being cautious.

“So the United States is probably going to miss the cup this time around.

“But I think it will be difficult to find rational reasons to exclude it at the next review point later in June, unless some worrying variations provide the excuse.”

Michael O’Leary, Managing Director of Ryanair, said: “The highly successful rollout of the vaccine in the UK has already enabled hundreds and thousands of UK families to book their flights to Portugal this summer, and today we call on Grant Shapps to include all EU countries in the next UK green list review. “

What are the Covid rates in the eight countries that should go green?

the Canary Islands

While the Canary Islands are currently classified in the amber category, their numbers are very similar to those of the green list country Portugal, reports the Mirror.

According to data from the PC Agency, the case rate is 38.4 per 100,000 people and 37.4 percent of its population have been vaccinated once.

This compares to 35.5% of people who received an injection and 25.7 cases per 100,000 people in Portugal.

the Balearic Islands

If these go green it will be a huge boost for UK travelers.

Mallorca, Menorca, Ibiza and the many small islands dotted in between are bound to be a huge draw for those who want some sort of liberation.

It is understood that the government wants to separate the larger island hotspots from their host territories in future updates, so the Balearics can get the green light before Spain.

Currently, Spain has a jab rate of 36.8% and a coronavirus rate of 72.8 / 100,000 compared to 13.1 and 18 / 100,000 for the Balearics.

Malta

This small Mediterranean archipelago is another privileged holiday destination that promises to be green.

It has an exorbitant vaccination rate of 70% and a coronavirus rate of 5.1 / 100,000, which are significantly better numbers than many countries currently on the green list.

Barbados

Perhaps the ultimate iteration of sun, sea and sand, this country on the amber list looks ripe to turn green.

For the moment, its vaccination rate is average at 26.6%, but only 7.3 cases of coronavirus are recorded per 100,000 people.

If Barbados is going green, it might be time to invest in a new pair of flip flops.

Finland

Not one of the busiest holiday destinations but a cultural mecca on the eastern end of Scandinavia, maybe now is the time to pull that chunky knit sweater out of the closet and head to Helsinki.

Currently, 42.3% of its population has been bitten and its coronavirus rate is 25 / 100,000.

Morocco

If Agence PC’s analysis is correct, Morocco will also go green.

While many places that can be added offer unparalleled beaches and blue seas, Morocco has both stunning beach resorts and sprawling historic towns to intrigue newcomers.

With a 22.1% jab rate and 2.9 / 100,000 coronavirus cases, he also has good numbers.

Grenade

One of the few countries in the world to have a coronavirus case rate of 0/100 000.

This tiny island in the West Indies has a population of just over 100,000 but has a lot to offer in the form of beautiful beaches.

He has a vaccination rate of 12.2 / 100,000.

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